Where are the Miracles?

“Miracles start to happen when you give as much energy to your dreams as you do to your fears.” Richard Wilkins

The Bible mentions countless examples of miracles. There are hundreds of them, for example: Jesus raises Lazarus from the dead, Jesus turns water into wine, Jesus walks on water, Jesus cures a blind man, etc. So if these miracles were possible then and if there truly is a God or a higher power, why wouldn’t miracles and divine interventions be possible today?

Miracles are typically supernatural, statistically impossible events that nonetheless occur. But what one may consider a miracle may not be so incredible to someone else. This week I had the opportunity to see Tony Melendez perform a concert for the parishioners of my church. His music filled the church as he beautifully strummed his guitar. Song after song, I found myself mesmerized by him lost in his tonymwords.

Tony was born with no arms after his mother was prescribed thalidomide for morning sickness while pregnant. His confidence in his music made me forget about his disability yet his inspiring faith in God and humanity often filled my eyes with grateful tears. What a gift it was to be able to witness his presence and feel his faith.

He told the parishioners that he felt normal growing up. Yes, he had no arms. But it wasn’t like he lost them and now misses them. He never had them.

Fitted with prosthetics at the age of 6, Tony soon realized that he could do just as much without them. He learned how to live his life to the fullest with what he did have. “Please don’t tell me that you can’t,” he said. “Because you can.”

In 1987, his life changed forever after he performed “Never Be the Same” for Pope John Paul II in Los Angeles. The Pope told him to keep playing and bringing hope to others. Tony became an overnight sensation and has since never stopped playing.

There was one thing that he said, however, that really struck a chord in me. Tony mentioned how people sometimes ask him, “Where are the miracles?” In answer to that seemingly difficult question, Tony effortlessly responds that he sees miracles in the very fact that people have arms. My eyes welled up with tears as I thought about his profound words.

We take so many things for granted in life. To a man like Tony just having arms is a miracle. Think about that for a moment. We don’t realize how blessed we truly are until something is taken away from us.

I, too, was born with a disability. Luckily, my cerebral palsy is mild but I still have my challenges. My muscles are numb and weak in some areas of my leg, and I suffer from bilateral hearing loss. I understand wholeheartedly what Tony means when he says he sees miracles in arms.

Growing up, I saw the kids playing and running in the street. Today, as an adult, I see people talking or listening to music. I have never heard an entire song. There are always words that escape my ears. So, to me, the very act of listening to music is miraculous. To me, each day that I can stand up and put one foot in front of the other is miraculous.

I was once told that I had no idea what I was missing because there are so many sounds I cannot hear. I remember standing in front of the audiologist somewhat stunned and confused. How could I even begin to comprehend what she was talking about if I’ve never had the opportunity to hear those sounds? Like Tony, this is my normal.

As the saying goes, it’s all relative. Most people don’t even give the fact that they have arms a second thought. Neither do people who are not hard of hearing. So, likewise, what you may perceive to be a miracle is dependent upon your view of certain things and situations. Everything is measured by individual perception.

Albert Einstein once said, “There are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” I don’t want to speak for Tony but, like me, I’d be willing to bet he’d say the latter.

Tony continues to travel around the world inspiring others through his gift of music. For more information, visit his website at www.tonymelendez.com.


My youngest daughter Lia was there with me as we all watched Tony. Seeing him left quite an impression on her and she wrote the following poem.


Do you really believe that you’ve never seen a miracle?

Look at your hands

A maze of crevices creating a path to your fingers

Opposable and capable

With these you can do anything

Your mind thinks but these hands can execute

They write stories, hold hands, catch Frisbees

Look at your hands

Do you really think that you’ve never seen a miracle?

Look at your hands


Tony sings for Pope John Paul II.



When Will This Madness End? A Note to President Trump

“I speak as an American to the leaders of my own nation. The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to stop it must be ours.” 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“If I don’t make it I love you and I appreciated everything you did for me,” a student wrote to a parent. As I read these words, endless tears streamed down my face. As the mother of two teenaged girls in high school, I cannot even imagine getting such a text from my daughters. It’s not only heartbreaking but it’s also inconceivable. No parent should have to worry about sending their child to school. No parent should have to question whether or not their child is safe.

Yesterday, when I first heard reports of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, the shooter was still at large. My heart raced as I thought not only about the students and teachers but also my parents and other relatives who live in Broward County.  It was a huge relief when I heard the shooter, 19-year old Nikolas Cruz was apprehended.

Thus far, the death toll stands at 17 with others wounded. Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said, “This is catastrophic. There are really no words.”  No, there are no words. No words will ever be enough. We don’t need words, we need action.


PHOTO: Tom Brenner/The New York Times

Mr. President, during your recent State of the Union Address you stated, “My duty, and the sacred duty of every elected official in this chamber, is to defend Americans, to protect their safety, their families, their communities, and their right to the American dream. Because Americans are dreamers, too.”

First let me say, I don’t envy you and would never want your job. I commend you for wanting to make America great again. You are 100 percent correct. It is your duty. However, it’s not yours alone. It is the duty of every American.

Sheriff Israel has repeatedly said, “If you see something, say something.” He also noted in a news conference earlier today that this is not the time to worry about saving money but rather about saving lives.

He went on to say that people are concerned about their rights but he questioned, “…what about the rights of young kids that go to schools with book bags and pencils, don’t they have the right to be protected by the United States Government to the best of our ability. . .”

Yes, they do! So the question is what do we do about it?  President Trump focused on the need to do more to identify and help those with mental illness.  While I think this true, it doesn’t stop there.  We do need more research to better understand mental illness and more resources to deal with it.  However, we also need stricter gun regulations.

Someone with a history of mental illness should not ever be allowed to purchase a gun. What continues to amaze me is that many of these shooters obtained their firearms legally.  In this case, Cruz obtained an AR-15.  According to Peter Forcelli, special agent in charge of the Miami field division of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, he purchased the gun legally and no laws were broken.

Really? A mentally disturbed individual who had a fascination with guns and posted disturbing images on social media is allowed to obtain firearms and no law were broken?  I’m sorry but I wholeheartedly disagree. If no laws were broken, we need to change the laws. We need stricter gun control.

While advocates of harsher gun regulations fear for their safety, opponents fear the loss of their safety. While I understand both sides, something has to change.  We need to find a medium because what we have now simply isn’t working.

Although regulations differ from state to state, here are three key points:

*You must be at least 18 years of age and must be a citizen or legal resident to purchase rifles, shotguns or ammunition.

*People who are considered a danger to society, fugitives or patients committed to mental institutions may not purchase guns.

*A background check is required before anyone can purchase a firearm.

So if a background check is required, what went wrong? Obviously, Cruz should not have passed this background check but did. These background checks need to be more extensive. We need to do more to make sure that these guns to do get into the wrong hands.

We also need more law enforcement, not less. Although it saddens me to have to say this, we need an armed guard at each school. Every morning when I drive my daughters, I see crossing guards stationed at each school. At times, these crossing guards are police officers. So why not rotate shifts with local police officers at every school?

My daughter Lia thinks a better solution would be to have metal detectors at every school. None of this comes without more costs and higher taxes. But when it comes to the safety of our children, I think many parents would opt for higher tax dollars. If anyone out there has other ideas, I’m all ears. My point here is that we have to do something. We cannot let this violence continue.

President Trump, you said we need to answer hate with love and cruelty with kindness. I agree. What we all need to remember is that despite these evil acts, there is far more good going on in this world. But we also can’t just speak empty words. We need action.

Today, Florida Governor Rick Scott said, “The violence has to stop. We cannot lose another child in this country to violence in a school.”

No, we cannot. But this responsibility rests not only with our government and law enforcement agencies, it rests also with every single American. Let’s please make sure something is done about this cruelty and violence. Let’s remember that good will forever prevail over evil.


“Your kingdom come.  Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.”

(Matthew 6:10 NRSV)

The first time, I had a reading with a psychic medium, I was understandably nervous and had no idea what to expect. I was put almost immediately at ease, however, when my deceased cousin Lina came through.  The medium gave me several validations which indicated that it was indeed my cousin including mimicking her personality.  But one thing he said has always stayed with me, “She said to tell you, ‘Boy, wait until you see how beautiful the afterlife is. Heaven is beautiful.’”

The day was December 28, 2007. I have never forgotten about that reading and, truthfully, so much has changed.  For one, I believe in the afterlife and the existence of heaven more than ever before.

At the time of the reading, I was in the midst of doing research for my book, Visits from Heaven. Since then, I have continued my afterlife research and have written several books.  One of the main and most difficult questions that I consistently get is what is heaven like? It’s difficult not because I’m not sure of its existence but rather because it has proven to be indescribable in so many ways.

Fortunately, I’ve interviewed many who say they have been to heaven and back over the years. And who better to answer this question than someone who’s been there?  There was something about Steven Musick’s story that really struck a chord in me.

After having a severe reaction to the swine flu vaccine while he was in the Navy, Musick died, went to heaven and even had a conversation with Jesus. As remarkable as that is, it’s not what drew me to his story.  Truthfully, I’ve heard it all before when speaking to NDErs.  What intrigued me was his claim that heaven is much closer than we think.

Steve-MusickWhen asked what heaven is like, Musick admits it is extremely difficult to describe the vitality of “That Place” but equates it to super high-definition TV on steroids. In his book, Life After Heaven, he describes seeing green meadows, rolling hills, billowy clouds and bright sunshine.

“The light is brilliant, beyond description,” he writes. I can see no roads or other construction. I am surrounded by a profound sense of abundance. Of completeness. Of perfect being.”  He goes on to describe heaven as a place of “explosive peace” and pure joy.

Heaven is a very real, physical place. In fact, he writes, it is more real than this world.  It’s a beautiful place that commands you to be present in the magnificence of the moment. Although I’ve never had a near-death experience, I understand full well what Musick is saying.  I’ve seen the vibrant colors in the visits from heaven that I’ve received.  I’ve felt that peace and the magnificence of the moment.

I couldn’t help but wonder what it was like, however, to actually be in the presence of Jesus. While walking with Jesus, Musick said he was given a life review. At that time, he understood that nothing in life is without purpose—both the good and the bad.  “He made everything that happened to me make sense,” said Musick.  “There is no real vacancy.  God was and is always there.”

Although he wanted to stay in heaven, he was told that he had to go back. When he did, he found that he had been in a coma for five weeks and his body was now weakened with 60 percent damage in both lungs along with a heart murmur.  His body once fit to join the ranks of the prestigious Navy SEALs went from 195 to 126 pounds.

He explains that his recovery was painful and the very act of breathing became an inconvenience. All that changed when he was allowed to visit heaven again. He experienced a miraculous healing while attending a church service.  He passed out on the floor of the Denver Vineyard church and found himself in the presence of Jesus once again.  This time, Jesus tells him, “Things will be different now.”

When he came through, he was able to take a full breath of air for the first time in 10 years. He felt whole once again.  Things were different; very different.

“When Jesus said, ‘Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven,’ he wants us to experience heaven here on earth. We should all experience more of the kingdom of heaven than we do,’” he explained.  We do this, he points out, by taking advantage of what he calls bubbles of heaven. These bubbles of heaven are, according to Musick, indicators of God’s profound reality in our lives.  They are opportunities to feel God’s presence in the here and now.  They are opportunities for us to spread joy and good in this world, love others and share God’s message.  They are profound moments when we can make a difference and heaven literally shines through us.

Musick shares examples of his own bubbles of heaven in his book. In one case, he confronts a stranger who was physically abusive to his wife.  The encounter ended with the man shedding tears of repentance.

Love, he says, is the language of heaven. “The economics of the kingdom of heaven are upside down: giving is better than getting, death can be life, life as the world sees it can be death, loss can be gain, gain can be loss,” he writes.  “God’s kingdom often flips the way we do little things upside down.”

The kingdom of heaven he notes is closer than we are led to believe but in order to notice it we have to allow it into our lives. When these bubbles of heaven arise, he notes, they need not be miraculous or paranormal. Sometimes they are seemingly ordinary events with the power to transform everyday lives.

His mission, he pointed out, is to share his experience and help people take full advantage of these moments. “My mission in life is to bring the message that the kingdom of heaven is closer than we think,” he said, “and everyone should experience it.”

For more information about Steven Musick or his book, please visit www.stevenmusick.com.

‘TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY? Getting Through the Holidays after a Loss

tree“Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes. Because for those who love with their heart and soul, there is no separation.” Rumi

Recently, I attended a bereavement group meeting with my sister who is grieving the loss of her husband John. While I will not disclose the private conversations that took place that night, I will say that everyone was struggling with getting through the holiday season without their loved one.

While the holiday season is a time for good cheer, joy and merriment for many, it is also a time when some are anxious to say good riddance as they count the days until it’s all over. For those who have lost a loved one, the holidays can understandably be the most painful time of the year.

One of the things I said during the bereavement meeting that night was you can’t come out of it unless you go through it. How then do you get through it? How can you get through the holiday season? How is it possible to walk down city sidewalks amid the holiday crowds when you don’t feel much like doing anything? For one thing, it’s important to remember that the anticipation of the holiday season is worse than the day or event itself. During the days leading up to the holiday event, we often feel the stress brought on by all the unrealistic holiday expectations and gatherings. Here are some tips to help you get through the holiday season:

1. Allow yourself to feel whatever it is you feel. Your feelings are your own and there is no right or wrong way to grieve. So be honest with yourself and allow yourself to grieve however you want. Take control of the situation. You don’t have to force yourself to be cheerful just because the holidays are here. If you don’t feel like attending a holiday party, don’t go. If you want to attend, then go. Allow yourself the opportunity to feel your pain and sadness but also allow yourself the opportunity to feel happiness and joy. Try to remind yourself that your loved one would want you to be happy.

2. Don’t expect too much of yourself. The holidays are full of unrealistic expectations. Don’t feel like you have to put up a Christmas tree, for example. If you are having a bad day and don’t want to go out, that’s OK. If you are having a good day and feel like you can manage buying a few gifts, that’s OK, too. Don’t try to do too much. If you usually have the holiday dinner at your house and don’t feel much like cooking, delegate it to someone else. Your family and friends will understand.

3. Ask for help. During the holidays what was once festive and light can now feel dreary and heavy. If you’re having a difficult time and need help, ask for it. Many people are more than willing to offer their assistance.One of the things that was discussed during the bereavement group meeting was how family and friends don’t know what to say and do. While some people may not call because they are afraid to say the wrong thing it doesn’t mean that they are not willing to help when asked.

4. Find ways to honor your loved one. One of the ways that I honor my lost loved ones at Christmas and every day of the year is by lighting candles in their memory. I also talk to my loved ones acknowledging their presence. It’s my way of saying that I know that they are still with me.

There are countless ways to remember your loved one so just do what feels right for you. Here are a few more suggestions:

a. Have everyone share a special memory involving your loved one.

b. Plan a day doing something that your loved one liked to do. For instance, go to his or her favorite restaurant.

c. Donate a gift in your loved one’s memory.

5. Take care of YOU! No matter how much your family and friends might want to help you, they don’t truly know what you need or how you are feeling. And your grief does not give you an excuse to ignore your own needs. In fact, it’s just the opposite. If you need to take some time off from work, do it. Try not to ignore whatever it is you are feeling. Pay attention to your body. If you’re feeling tired, don’t overdo it. Take a nap or go to bed early. If you’re not feeling well, go see a doctor. Perhaps, a complete physical will do you good.

6. Remember, love never dies. As an author and afterlife researcher, I can tell you without a doubt that your loved ones are still with you in spirit. The love that you shared is still there and will always be there.   Your loved ones are still part of your life and are aware of everything that is going on here on earth.

As an example, my husband’s friend Rich died in the World Trade Center attacks of 9/11. This year we attended a high school play featuring Rich’s son in the lead role as Macheath in The Threepenny Opera. In October I attended a spirit circle featuring two psychic mediums, Dean and Stuart, from England. Dean stood directly in front of me that evening and told me Rich was there. He told me that Rich was saying that I attended a very important event for his son recently and he wanted to thank me for that.

Dean was unknowingly referring to the play that my husband and I attended.   Keep in mind that this was not public knowledge so Dean could not have read about this anywhere. My point in telling you this story is to remind you wholeheartedly that love never dies. Our loved ones are still with us and are very much aware of what is going on in our lives.

Everyone grieves in their own way. Do whatever you feel is best for you. Allow yourself time to deal with the pain but also allow yourself time to be happy. Our loved ones in heaven do want us to experience joy once again.

Whatever you do; wherever you go this holiday season, reach within and feel the love in your heart. When you do, you’ll realize your loved one never truly left you.

Say Thank You

“Gratitude is the healthiest of all human emotions. The more you express gratitude for what you have, the more likely you will have even more to express gratitude for.”

Zig Ziglar

Last week as my family and I sat down to enjoy our Thanksgiving dinner, we first took a moment to say thank you and acknowledge our gratitude. It was a touching, yet emotional time.  Not only did we express gratitude for our blessings that day but we also acknowledged our loved ones who were no longer with us and thanked God for the time we did have with them.

thankyouIt was beautiful and transforming as it really helped to shift the attention in the room. In that moment, we were reminded of the importance of focusing on our blessings rather than our misgivings and hardships.

Two words, “thank you,” have the power to create stronger, lasting bonds. These two words have the power to make people feel appreciated and work harder.  They have the power to increase our joy and happiness.  Yet, these two words are largely underutilized.

I once sent a gift to a friend. Afterwards, as time went by, I never heard from her.  Not a simple text; not an email or a thank you card.  Nothing.  To me, right or wrong, this sent a message that my gift was underappreciated.  This may not have been the case, of course, but I wouldn’t have known. Unfortunately, some people fail to see the benefits of these two simple, yet powerful words.

Gratitude is essential for healthy, long-term relationships—both personal and professional. In fact, studies show that the number one reason people leave their job is because they feel underappreciated.  You would automatically think it would be to earn more money but this isn’t the case.  A little show of gratitude can make a big difference to a company’s bottom line.

The benefits of showing thankfulness are endless. Here are just a few:

  1. Not surprisingly, people who focus on gratitude, live happier, more fulfilling lives. When people feel appreciated, negative emotions like anger, frustration and jealousy diminish. They also have a higher level of self-esteem.
  2. In addition to improving mental health, feelings of gratitude also improve our physical health. People who feel appreciated have stronger immune systems and live healthier, longer lives.
  3. Those who feel appreciated are more willing to be of service to others. They are not as materialistic and see the value of the simple things in life.
  4. Grateful people are naturally more optimistic and have a greater capacity to forgive others.

Simply put, feelings of appreciation lead to positive thinking and positive thinking leads to positive action. Positive thinking hence leads to a more positive, fulfilling life.

However, don’t say thank you if you are not sincere. Say thank you when you truly mean to say thank you.  Your insincerity will only show if you don’t really mean it.

Also, don’t sweeten the deal with a promise you can’t keep. People sometimes offer things that they have no intention of giving.  For example, if you say thank you to someone and also offer to follow up with a dinner, do just that.  Don’t offer things you can’t give or make promises you can’t keep.

So as you go through the holiday season, remember to say thank you often. When we focus on and appreciate what we already have in our lives and not what is lacking, we inevitably draw more abundance into our lives.  When we give thanks, we bring thanks.  And this is key to living a healthy, happy, fulfilling life.

“Heavenly” Cigarette Smoke

“Everyone is psychic to some degree, and really successful paranormal investigators even if they do not realize it are using their own psychic ability to sense the environment.”

Rosemary Ellen Guiley

SRJD2 (2)

Stuart James-Foy (left) Rosemary Ellen Guiley, Josie Varga and Dean James-Foy

Trust is vital to all relationships. In fact, without trust there can be no relationship. Trust is the basis from which all relationships begin. This includes our relationship with spirit and our ability to communicate with the other side.

Recently, I was invited to participate in a spirit circle with Stuart and Dean James-Foy, two accomplished mediums from England. The event was hosted by leading paranormal expert Rosemary Ellen Guiley and psychic medium Karl Petry.

Spirit circles are basically small open or gallery type readings. The psychic medium draws on the collective energy of the group and there is no telling what can happen as I later found out. At the start, we were told to focus on someone we wanted to come through. My mind immediately went to my brother-in-law John.

On September 5, 2017, John passed from lung cancer. He smoked cigarettes and cigars for many years. My sister is really having a tough time and I hoped to bring her a message of comfort from her husband. Suddenly, I began to hear the tune to My Girl by the Temptations in my head.

My brother-in-law loved Motown music and this song always reminds me of him. Once when we were at my brother’s house, John began singing and dancing to My Girl. So while he was on his deathbed, I sang part of the lyrics to him as my sister-in-law joined in. Another time when I was alone with him in the hospital, I hummed the song to him. So it’s easy to see why this song is so significant.

However, as I heard the song in my head that night, I began to doubt what I was hearing. Trust involves believing in something you can’t see and with that often comes uncertainty.

Shortly after this, Stuart and Dean led us through a meditation exercise. To be perfectly honest, I wasn’t feeling well and didn’t think I would get anything. However, almost immediately I saw my brother in law. He was sitting on a large rock fishing as I sat next to him. He looked younger, thinner and content. We chatted as he fished always looking straight ahead. He never turned towards me so I never saw his face.

I felt like I was with John a long time but in reality, it could not have been more than a few minutes. When I snapped out of my meditative state, I noticed my husband John looking at me with this odd look on his face. “What happened?” he asked. I looked at him and whispered, “John. John is here.”

At that very same time, Stuart stood up in front of the crowd and asked if anyone had an experience that they wanted to share. The woman sitting directly behind me whom I never met before immediately raised her hand. “I don’t know why,” she told the crowd, “I smell cigarette smoke.”

I let out a loud gasp as the look of complete shock covered my face. My husband stared at me in disbelief. Noticing my reaction, Stuart asked me to tell everyone what was going on.

The week after my brother-in-law passed, I was bringing groceries into the kitchen and clearly sensed cigarette smoke. There were no windows opened as I had the air conditioning on. Also, no one in my household smokes cigarettes.

Clairscent is the ability to smell something associated with your deceased loved one. It can be anything that is associated with them. For instance, you may smell a certain perfume or flower. You can smell a food associated with them or even cigar or cigarette smoke.

I quickly yelled for my daughter Lia to come down the stairs. But by the time she did, the smell was gone. I told Lia, however, about the smell and explained that I felt this was a sign from her Uncle John.

A few days later, Lia told me that she was in the bathroom when the room suddenly filled with the smell of cigarettes. She told me she instantly knew it was her uncle.

Last month, my daughter participated in a parish fundraiser for the homeless. On this night, she slept on the sidewalk outside of our church with her sleeping bag.

The following morning, everyone partook in a mass inside the church. Lia went up to receive Holy Communion and then went back to her pew. She knelt down and closed her eyes as she prayed. As part of her prayers that morning, she spoke to my brother-in-law privately telling him how much she loved and missed him.

As she was talking to her uncle, her friend Meghan (kneeling next to her) tapped her on the shoulder interrupting her thoughts. “Lia,” she said, “Do you smell that? It smells like cigarette smoke.” Of course, there was no one smoking cigarettes inside the church.

Lia smiled knowing her Uncle John was with her and acknowledged his presence. Keep in mind that her friend Meghan did not know about our previous experiences with the scent of cigarette smoke. So why did Meghan smell the cigarette smoke at the exact time that Lia was telepathically speaking to her uncle? Going through Meghan, someone who had no knowledge of what happened, serves as a validation that it was really him.

Getting back to the spirit circle, this marked the fourth time my brother-in-lawpresented himself in this way. Once our loved ones know that we recognize and associate a sign as being from them, they will most often repeat it. As I shared my story that night, the crowd was equally stunned as we all witnessed yet another incredible validation from the spirit world.

My husband later told me that he knew something was going on as he watched me sitting with my eyes closed meditating that night. He said I was making minor movements with my body and would make slight sounds.

Keep in mind that I am not a psychic medium but I have received many incredible signs or what I like to call visits from heaven over the years. But I have to admit that this experience is in my top 10. So can anyone communicate with departed loved ones? Yes, we can. It comes easier to some than others but everyone is born with some level of intuitive ability. Some people develop or fine tune these capabilities and others don’t. However, the opportunity to part the veil is available to everyone.

The spirit world communicates in many ways. Most often they are not as pronounced as the experience I mentioned above but rather subtle. It’s important that we learn to trust what we are given. In Parting the Veil: How to Communicate with the Spirit World, (Visionary Living, Inc./2017) Stuart and Dean James-Foy talk about how all mediums naturally go through a doubting phrase. “You may think, ‘That’s not right,’ or, ‘No, it can’t be’ or ‘Is my mind making this up’? Messages are given for a reason. Trusting them builds trust with spirit.” The book highlights a variety of useful exercises to help people connect with spirit.

Trusting is not always easy, however. Your ego will often be there telling you something different. In my case, for example, I thought hearing My Girl was just wishful thinking. Even though intuitively I knew it was my brother in law, my ego got in the way.

Knowing the difference between the voice of your ego and the voice of your spirit takes practice and trust. But if you’re willing to take the time to listen, I promise you spirit will not disappoint.

In the Face of Evil, Love and Compassion will Always Prevail

“There are no greater treasures than the highest human qualities such as compassion, courage and hope. Not even tragic accidents or disaster can destroy such treasures of the heart.”

Daisaku Ikeda

thI honestly can’t wrap my head around it. Violence seems to have become the norm in so many ways around the world. From school shootings to terrorist attacks at home and abroad, it has been overwhelming and extremely disheartening.

Yesterday, as my 16-year old, daughter Lia got into my car at the end of the school day, she asked, “Mom, did you hear about what happened in Las Vegas?” I looked at her sadly not wanting to discuss yet another mass killing with my daughter.  Lia proceeded to tell me that she rushed to text a friend who lives in Las Vegas as soon as she heard the news.  “My friend is OK,” she said with a sigh of relief.

“I don’t get it, Mom,” she said. “Why would someone do that?”  Unfortunately, I had no answers for my daughter and I still don’t.  It sickens me to have such grim conversations with my children. As a young girl growing up in the 80’s, I honestly don’t remember ever having such chats with my mother.  Don’t get me wrong.  Bad things happened then, too, of course.  But it just seems like they are happening far more often today.

At least 59 people were killed with over 500 injured, some critically, when a gunman opened fire from the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Sunday night.  It is being deemed the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history.

Both the injured and the dead represent people from all walks of life. From police officers to teachers and adults to teenagers; the bullets did not discriminate.  An arsenal of firearms, including automatic weapons, were found in the killer’s (64-year old, former accountant Stephen Paddock) hotel room.  As of this writing, law enforcement officials can find no clear motive for such a horrendous crime.

As I said, I just can’t wrap my head around it nor do I have an answer for my daughter Lia. But there is one thing I do know and that is love and compassion will always prevail in the face of evil.  If you look at any of the recent terrorist attacks or shootings at home and abroad you will find the heroes.  You will find the compassionate souls who risked their lives to help complete strangers.

Sunday’s shooting was no different. My eyes filled with tears today as I read the many brave accounts.  I read about the mom who used her body to shield her daughter and the many who drove the injured to the hospital in their personal vehicles.  I heard about the young girl who once out of harm’s way decided to turn back into the violence.  When asked why, she explained that she wanted to help the victims.

Then there was also a bartender named Heather who held a stranger in her arms as he died. She then remained with his body not wanting to leave him alone.  If you look at the many pictures posted online, you’ll see numerous shirtless individuals who used their clothing as tourniquets to help the injured.

Many of these heroes were among those who lost their lives. If it weren’t for the selfless acts of so many caring strangers, countless lives would not have been spared.  President Trump summed it up well when he said, “Our unity cannot be shattered by evil. Our bonds cannot be broken by violence. And though we feel such great anger at the senseless murder of our fellow citizens, it is our love that defines us today—and always will, forever.”

Very true. It is love and the countless acts of compassion that define us.  In the face of terror and evil, we are no longer strangers.  We are one; our hearts forever united.  In the midst of tragedy, the goodness of humanity stands unshaken.


This blog is dedicated to all the victims of Sunday’s attack. A special heart-felt thank you goes out to all the unsung heroes.  It is this love and compassion that will forever define us. Again, thank you from the bottom of my heart.