Where are the Miracles?

“Miracles start to happen when you give as much energy to your dreams as you do to your fears.” Richard Wilkins

The Bible mentions countless examples of miracles. There are hundreds of them, for example: Jesus raises Lazarus from the dead, Jesus turns water into wine, Jesus walks on water, Jesus cures a blind man, etc. So if these miracles were possible then and if there truly is a God or a higher power, why wouldn’t miracles and divine interventions be possible today?

Miracles are typically supernatural, statistically impossible events that nonetheless occur. But what one may consider a miracle may not be so incredible to someone else. This week I had the opportunity to see Tony Melendez perform a concert for the parishioners of my church. His music filled the church as he beautifully strummed his guitar. Song after song, I found myself mesmerized by him lost in his tonymwords.

Tony was born with no arms after his mother was prescribed thalidomide for morning sickness while pregnant. His confidence in his music made me forget about his disability yet his inspiring faith in God and humanity often filled my eyes with grateful tears. What a gift it was to be able to witness his presence and feel his faith.

He told the parishioners that he felt normal growing up. Yes, he had no arms. But it wasn’t like he lost them and now misses them. He never had them.

Fitted with prosthetics at the age of 6, Tony soon realized that he could do just as much without them. He learned how to live his life to the fullest with what he did have. “Please don’t tell me that you can’t,” he said. “Because you can.”

In 1987, his life changed forever after he performed “Never Be the Same” for Pope John Paul II in Los Angeles. The Pope told him to keep playing and bringing hope to others. Tony became an overnight sensation and has since never stopped playing.

There was one thing that he said, however, that really struck a chord in me. Tony mentioned how people sometimes ask him, “Where are the miracles?” In answer to that seemingly difficult question, Tony effortlessly responds that he sees miracles in the very fact that people have arms. My eyes welled up with tears as I thought about his profound words.

We take so many things for granted in life. To a man like Tony just having arms is a miracle. Think about that for a moment. We don’t realize how blessed we truly are until something is taken away from us.

I, too, was born with a disability. Luckily, my cerebral palsy is mild but I still have my challenges. My muscles are numb and weak in some areas of my leg, and I suffer from bilateral hearing loss. I understand wholeheartedly what Tony means when he says he sees miracles in arms.

Growing up, I saw the kids playing and running in the street. Today, as an adult, I see people talking or listening to music. I have never heard an entire song. There are always words that escape my ears. So, to me, the very act of listening to music is miraculous. To me, each day that I can stand up and put one foot in front of the other is miraculous.

I was once told that I had no idea what I was missing because there are so many sounds I cannot hear. I remember standing in front of the audiologist somewhat stunned and confused. How could I even begin to comprehend what she was talking about if I’ve never had the opportunity to hear those sounds? Like Tony, this is my normal.

As the saying goes, it’s all relative. Most people don’t even give the fact that they have arms a second thought. Neither do people who are not hard of hearing. So, likewise, what you may perceive to be a miracle is dependent upon your view of certain things and situations. Everything is measured by individual perception.

Albert Einstein once said, “There are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” I don’t want to speak for Tony but, like me, I’d be willing to bet he’d say the latter.

Tony continues to travel around the world inspiring others through his gift of music. For more information, visit his website at www.tonymelendez.com.

******************************

My youngest daughter Lia was there with me as we all watched Tony. Seeing him left quite an impression on her and she wrote the following poem.

LOOK AT YOUR HANDS

Do you really believe that you’ve never seen a miracle?

Look at your hands

A maze of crevices creating a path to your fingers

Opposable and capable

With these you can do anything

Your mind thinks but these hands can execute

They write stories, hold hands, catch Frisbees

Look at your hands

Do you really think that you’ve never seen a miracle?

Look at your hands

 

Tony sings for Pope John Paul II.

 

Advertisements

IS HEAVEN REAL? WHAT IS HEAVEN LIKE?

“Your kingdom come.  Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.”

(Matthew 6:10 NRSV)

The first time, I had a reading with a psychic medium, I was understandably nervous and had no idea what to expect. I was put almost immediately at ease, however, when my deceased cousin Lina came through.  The medium gave me several validations which indicated that it was indeed my cousin including mimicking her personality.  But one thing he said has always stayed with me, “She said to tell you, ‘Boy, wait until you see how beautiful the afterlife is. Heaven is beautiful.’”

The day was December 28, 2007. I have never forgotten about that reading and, truthfully, so much has changed.  For one, I believe in the afterlife and the existence of heaven more than ever before.

At the time of the reading, I was in the midst of doing research for my book, Visits from Heaven. Since then, I have continued my afterlife research and have written several books.  One of the main and most difficult questions that I consistently get is what is heaven like? It’s difficult not because I’m not sure of its existence but rather because it has proven to be indescribable in so many ways.

Fortunately, I’ve interviewed many who say they have been to heaven and back over the years. And who better to answer this question than someone who’s been there?  There was something about Steven Musick’s story that really struck a chord in me.

After having a severe reaction to the swine flu vaccine while he was in the Navy, Musick died, went to heaven and even had a conversation with Jesus. As remarkable as that is, it’s not what drew me to his story.  Truthfully, I’ve heard it all before when speaking to NDErs.  What intrigued me was his claim that heaven is much closer than we think.

Steve-MusickWhen asked what heaven is like, Musick admits it is extremely difficult to describe the vitality of “That Place” but equates it to super high-definition TV on steroids. In his book, Life After Heaven, he describes seeing green meadows, rolling hills, billowy clouds and bright sunshine.

“The light is brilliant, beyond description,” he writes. I can see no roads or other construction. I am surrounded by a profound sense of abundance. Of completeness. Of perfect being.”  He goes on to describe heaven as a place of “explosive peace” and pure joy.

Heaven is a very real, physical place. In fact, he writes, it is more real than this world.  It’s a beautiful place that commands you to be present in the magnificence of the moment. Although I’ve never had a near-death experience, I understand full well what Musick is saying.  I’ve seen the vibrant colors in the visits from heaven that I’ve received.  I’ve felt that peace and the magnificence of the moment.

I couldn’t help but wonder what it was like, however, to actually be in the presence of Jesus. While walking with Jesus, Musick said he was given a life review. At that time, he understood that nothing in life is without purpose—both the good and the bad.  “He made everything that happened to me make sense,” said Musick.  “There is no real vacancy.  God was and is always there.”

Although he wanted to stay in heaven, he was told that he had to go back. When he did, he found that he had been in a coma for five weeks and his body was now weakened with 60 percent damage in both lungs along with a heart murmur.  His body once fit to join the ranks of the prestigious Navy SEALs went from 195 to 126 pounds.

He explains that his recovery was painful and the very act of breathing became an inconvenience. All that changed when he was allowed to visit heaven again. He experienced a miraculous healing while attending a church service.  He passed out on the floor of the Denver Vineyard church and found himself in the presence of Jesus once again.  This time, Jesus tells him, “Things will be different now.”

When he came through, he was able to take a full breath of air for the first time in 10 years. He felt whole once again.  Things were different; very different.

“When Jesus said, ‘Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven,’ he wants us to experience heaven here on earth. We should all experience more of the kingdom of heaven than we do,’” he explained.  We do this, he points out, by taking advantage of what he calls bubbles of heaven. These bubbles of heaven are, according to Musick, indicators of God’s profound reality in our lives.  They are opportunities to feel God’s presence in the here and now.  They are opportunities for us to spread joy and good in this world, love others and share God’s message.  They are profound moments when we can make a difference and heaven literally shines through us.

Musick shares examples of his own bubbles of heaven in his book. In one case, he confronts a stranger who was physically abusive to his wife.  The encounter ended with the man shedding tears of repentance.

Love, he says, is the language of heaven. “The economics of the kingdom of heaven are upside down: giving is better than getting, death can be life, life as the world sees it can be death, loss can be gain, gain can be loss,” he writes.  “God’s kingdom often flips the way we do little things upside down.”

The kingdom of heaven he notes is closer than we are led to believe but in order to notice it we have to allow it into our lives. When these bubbles of heaven arise, he notes, they need not be miraculous or paranormal. Sometimes they are seemingly ordinary events with the power to transform everyday lives.

His mission, he pointed out, is to share his experience and help people take full advantage of these moments. “My mission in life is to bring the message that the kingdom of heaven is closer than we think,” he said, “and everyone should experience it.”

For more information about Steven Musick or his book, please visit www.stevenmusick.com.

‘TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY? Getting Through the Holidays after a Loss

tree“Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes. Because for those who love with their heart and soul, there is no separation.” Rumi

Recently, I attended a bereavement group meeting with my sister who is grieving the loss of her husband John. While I will not disclose the private conversations that took place that night, I will say that everyone was struggling with getting through the holiday season without their loved one.

While the holiday season is a time for good cheer, joy and merriment for many, it is also a time when some are anxious to say good riddance as they count the days until it’s all over. For those who have lost a loved one, the holidays can understandably be the most painful time of the year.

One of the things I said during the bereavement meeting that night was you can’t come out of it unless you go through it. How then do you get through it? How can you get through the holiday season? How is it possible to walk down city sidewalks amid the holiday crowds when you don’t feel much like doing anything? For one thing, it’s important to remember that the anticipation of the holiday season is worse than the day or event itself. During the days leading up to the holiday event, we often feel the stress brought on by all the unrealistic holiday expectations and gatherings. Here are some tips to help you get through the holiday season:

1. Allow yourself to feel whatever it is you feel. Your feelings are your own and there is no right or wrong way to grieve. So be honest with yourself and allow yourself to grieve however you want. Take control of the situation. You don’t have to force yourself to be cheerful just because the holidays are here. If you don’t feel like attending a holiday party, don’t go. If you want to attend, then go. Allow yourself the opportunity to feel your pain and sadness but also allow yourself the opportunity to feel happiness and joy. Try to remind yourself that your loved one would want you to be happy.

2. Don’t expect too much of yourself. The holidays are full of unrealistic expectations. Don’t feel like you have to put up a Christmas tree, for example. If you are having a bad day and don’t want to go out, that’s OK. If you are having a good day and feel like you can manage buying a few gifts, that’s OK, too. Don’t try to do too much. If you usually have the holiday dinner at your house and don’t feel much like cooking, delegate it to someone else. Your family and friends will understand.

3. Ask for help. During the holidays what was once festive and light can now feel dreary and heavy. If you’re having a difficult time and need help, ask for it. Many people are more than willing to offer their assistance.One of the things that was discussed during the bereavement group meeting was how family and friends don’t know what to say and do. While some people may not call because they are afraid to say the wrong thing it doesn’t mean that they are not willing to help when asked.

4. Find ways to honor your loved one. One of the ways that I honor my lost loved ones at Christmas and every day of the year is by lighting candles in their memory. I also talk to my loved ones acknowledging their presence. It’s my way of saying that I know that they are still with me.

There are countless ways to remember your loved one so just do what feels right for you. Here are a few more suggestions:

a. Have everyone share a special memory involving your loved one.

b. Plan a day doing something that your loved one liked to do. For instance, go to his or her favorite restaurant.

c. Donate a gift in your loved one’s memory.

5. Take care of YOU! No matter how much your family and friends might want to help you, they don’t truly know what you need or how you are feeling. And your grief does not give you an excuse to ignore your own needs. In fact, it’s just the opposite. If you need to take some time off from work, do it. Try not to ignore whatever it is you are feeling. Pay attention to your body. If you’re feeling tired, don’t overdo it. Take a nap or go to bed early. If you’re not feeling well, go see a doctor. Perhaps, a complete physical will do you good.

6. Remember, love never dies. As an author and afterlife researcher, I can tell you without a doubt that your loved ones are still with you in spirit. The love that you shared is still there and will always be there.   Your loved ones are still part of your life and are aware of everything that is going on here on earth.

As an example, my husband’s friend Rich died in the World Trade Center attacks of 9/11. This year we attended a high school play featuring Rich’s son in the lead role as Macheath in The Threepenny Opera. In October I attended a spirit circle featuring two psychic mediums, Dean and Stuart, from England. Dean stood directly in front of me that evening and told me Rich was there. He told me that Rich was saying that I attended a very important event for his son recently and he wanted to thank me for that.

Dean was unknowingly referring to the play that my husband and I attended.   Keep in mind that this was not public knowledge so Dean could not have read about this anywhere. My point in telling you this story is to remind you wholeheartedly that love never dies. Our loved ones are still with us and are very much aware of what is going on in our lives.

Everyone grieves in their own way. Do whatever you feel is best for you. Allow yourself time to deal with the pain but also allow yourself time to be happy. Our loved ones in heaven do want us to experience joy once again.

Whatever you do; wherever you go this holiday season, reach within and feel the love in your heart. When you do, you’ll realize your loved one never truly left you.

In the Face of Evil, Love and Compassion will Always Prevail

“There are no greater treasures than the highest human qualities such as compassion, courage and hope. Not even tragic accidents or disaster can destroy such treasures of the heart.”

Daisaku Ikeda

thI honestly can’t wrap my head around it. Violence seems to have become the norm in so many ways around the world. From school shootings to terrorist attacks at home and abroad, it has been overwhelming and extremely disheartening.

Yesterday, as my 16-year old, daughter Lia got into my car at the end of the school day, she asked, “Mom, did you hear about what happened in Las Vegas?” I looked at her sadly not wanting to discuss yet another mass killing with my daughter.  Lia proceeded to tell me that she rushed to text a friend who lives in Las Vegas as soon as she heard the news.  “My friend is OK,” she said with a sigh of relief.

“I don’t get it, Mom,” she said. “Why would someone do that?”  Unfortunately, I had no answers for my daughter and I still don’t.  It sickens me to have such grim conversations with my children. As a young girl growing up in the 80’s, I honestly don’t remember ever having such chats with my mother.  Don’t get me wrong.  Bad things happened then, too, of course.  But it just seems like they are happening far more often today.

At least 59 people were killed with over 500 injured, some critically, when a gunman opened fire from the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Sunday night.  It is being deemed the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history.

Both the injured and the dead represent people from all walks of life. From police officers to teachers and adults to teenagers; the bullets did not discriminate.  An arsenal of firearms, including automatic weapons, were found in the killer’s (64-year old, former accountant Stephen Paddock) hotel room.  As of this writing, law enforcement officials can find no clear motive for such a horrendous crime.

As I said, I just can’t wrap my head around it nor do I have an answer for my daughter Lia. But there is one thing I do know and that is love and compassion will always prevail in the face of evil.  If you look at any of the recent terrorist attacks or shootings at home and abroad you will find the heroes.  You will find the compassionate souls who risked their lives to help complete strangers.

Sunday’s shooting was no different. My eyes filled with tears today as I read the many brave accounts.  I read about the mom who used her body to shield her daughter and the many who drove the injured to the hospital in their personal vehicles.  I heard about the young girl who once out of harm’s way decided to turn back into the violence.  When asked why, she explained that she wanted to help the victims.

Then there was also a bartender named Heather who held a stranger in her arms as he died. She then remained with his body not wanting to leave him alone.  If you look at the many pictures posted online, you’ll see numerous shirtless individuals who used their clothing as tourniquets to help the injured.

Many of these heroes were among those who lost their lives. If it weren’t for the selfless acts of so many caring strangers, countless lives would not have been spared.  President Trump summed it up well when he said, “Our unity cannot be shattered by evil. Our bonds cannot be broken by violence. And though we feel such great anger at the senseless murder of our fellow citizens, it is our love that defines us today—and always will, forever.”

Very true. It is love and the countless acts of compassion that define us.  In the face of terror and evil, we are no longer strangers.  We are one; our hearts forever united.  In the midst of tragedy, the goodness of humanity stands unshaken.

 

This blog is dedicated to all the victims of Sunday’s attack. A special heart-felt thank you goes out to all the unsung heroes.  It is this love and compassion that will forever define us. Again, thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Death is Just a Comma

“Love is how you stay alive, even after you are gone.” ― Mitch Albom

Death it is said is a painful reminder that life is just too short. While this is true death is also more importantly, in my opinion, a reminder that nothing is stronger than the bonds of love. As Thomas Campbell once said, “To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.”

neverendingcommaTrue. But I would take this a step further and say that love also lives on in the spirit of our loved ones on the other side of the veil. Love is not just an emotion you feel, it is a connection you have with someone else. This connection is unending. It’s always there.

Sure, after someone dies, things change. We can no longer see our loved ones in the physical as we always did. But it does not mean they are not still there in spirit. Recently, my sister in law Shari lost her mother after a long battle with cancer. Her brother flew home from Florida to be there with his mother but she passed shortly before he arrived.

Of course, he was very upset as he wanted to be there with his mother. But I reminded him that now his mother can be with him no matter where he is. Once our loved ones pass, they can still hear us; they can still see us, and they communicate with us in many ways to let us know that they are still around. Have you ever wondered what makes this afterlife communication possible? The never-ending love makes it possible; that connection that we shared on earth and continue to share in the hereafter. That bond of love we shared here on earth remains intact.

Scientists have long discovered that everything in the universe is energy. The computer you are looking at, the chair you’re sitting on, the trees outside . . . everything! This also includes our thoughts, our love for one another and the human body. Quantum mechanics has clearly shown that what we perceive as physical is actually not physical at all.

At the forefront of quantum theory was a Danish physicist named Niels Bohr. “If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet,” he once noted. “Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.”

Bohr, for example, made fundamental contributions to our current-day understanding of the configuration of an atom. Atoms it was discovered are actually composed of vortices of energy that are always vibrating and spinning. If you break down the human body you will find atoms. And if you zoom in on the atom under a microscope through these vortices of energy, you would see nothing. Simply put, atoms are made up of invisible or unseen energy, not physical matter.

This is so incredibly astounding when it comes to understanding how the afterlife or visits from heaven are even possible.  Quantum entanglement, for example, is a phenomenon which shows that although we perceive the world and everything in it to be separate, we are actually connected.  Several studies have shown that although particles can be any distance apart, even across the solar system from each other, they are still linked together.  This was referred to as “spooky action at a distance” by Albert Einstein.

Even though our deceased loved may appear to be gone, they are very much still here.  This entanglement or connection if you will is always there.  Many prominent modern-day researchers believe that the concept of quantum mechanics actually proves the existence of an afterlife.

Former head of the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich, Dr. Hans-Peter Durr, stated, “”What we consider the here and now, this world, it is actually just the material level that is comprehensible. The beyond is an infinite reality that is much bigger. Which this world is rooted in. In this way, our lives in this plane of existence are encompassed, surrounded, by the afterworld already… The body dies but the spiritual quantum field continues. In this way, I am immortal.”*

We are all so much more than we appear to be. What we perceive as our material reality is actually not material but spiritual. So simply put, since energy can never be created or destroyed, it always is and always will be. As Durr put it, we are immortal.

Death, then, is a continuation not an end. Death is like a comma but instead of connecting two phrases or words it connects the here with the hereafter.

Recently, I was asked if I believed afterlife communication is real and, if so, how is it even possible.  In answer to the first question, yes, it is absolutely real.  I would not have written my initial book on the topic, Visits from Heaven/4th Dimension Press, if I didn’t truly believe it.  This blog represents my attempt to answer the second question as simply as I could and explain how such communication is scientifically possible.

I once read that death ends a life, not a relationship. I both agree and disagree. Death will never end a relationship or bond between two people. But it doesn’t really end a life either. Death is just a comma in the never ending run-on sentence of life.

*https://www.outerplaces.com/science/item/4518-physicists-claim-that-consciousness-lives-in-quantum-state-after-death

lillianThis blog is dedicated in loving memory of Lillian Merlo Bartlett.  Lillian, you will forever be in our hearts as we will forever be with your spirit.

 

 

 

 

 

“There Can’t Be a God”

“Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens.”

J.R.R.Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Thkeepthefaithe other day my daughter Lia hurried over to the kitchen table where my husband and I were enjoying our morning coffee.  She handed me her cell phone saying, “Mom, please talk to Talia.”  I had no idea what she was talking about and asked her why I had to talk to her friend.  “You’ll see, Mom.  Just talk to her.”

I took the phone from my daughter.  “Hello, Talia (not her real name).  Is everything OK?”  I could hear her hesitation for a few seconds on the other end.

“Mrs. Varga, there can’t be a God,” she told me.  “My dad is dying and now I may have torn my ACL (anterior cruciate ligament).  All these bad things are happening to me and my family.  Why would God allow all these bad things to happen?”

Talia’s thinking is not uncommon.  If an all-loving God exist, He would not allow bad things to happen.  Bad things happen.  Evil does exist.  Therefore, there must be no God.

Understanding her frustration, I took a deep breath wanting to choose my words carefully.  “Talia, I know you and your family are hurting right now.  But just because bad things happen does not mean there isn’t a God.  I know you are angry but I also know you don’t really believe there isn’t a God.”

I could tell Talia was holding back tears at this point and to be honest I wanted to cry right along with her.

“You can’t lose your faith,” I told her.  “Without faith, what do you have?  During times like this you need to hang on to your faith even more.  God is all loving.  God does not make bad things happen.  He allows it but He does not create it.”

I can unequivocally say that my faith has carried me through tough, painful times in my life. But this same faith has also been challenged many times. It’s hard not to let your faith waiver under the pressure of all the immense suffering in this world. It’s hard not to let your trust in a Higher Power waiver when we are hurting and in pain. But it is in these times that we need to trust Him more. We need to tighten the grip of our faith, not loosen it.

Again, God is all loving. Love is our true essence and purpose. In order for us to experience this love, we must have free will. There must be choice in love. If we are not given a choice to love or not to love, then it’s not real. And unfortunately, with that choice and with that free will, comes pain and suffering.

Think about it for a moment. With the gift of life comes many trials and with those trials come many lessons. There is a lesson in every experience if we are willing to listen. Through hurt, pain and betrayal, we learn humility, patience, forgiveness, strength, compassion and acceptance.

I honestly don’t know if my words got through to Talia that morning but I wanted to share this story with all of you. I hope you will use it to remember in both good times and in bad to always keep the faith. The sun forever rises after the darkness of the night. And what a beautiful sight it is to witness the sunrise.

Mother Teresa is Now Saint Teresa of Calcutta

Ostteresan Sunday, September 4, Mother Teresa was declared a saint in a canonization mass in the Vatican.  Born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in 1910, Mother Teresa was known as the “saint of the gutters” for her relentless service to the poor, the sick and the dying.  Pope Francis praised Mother Teresa saying, “Mother Teresa, in all aspects of her life, was a generous dispenser of divine mercy, making herself available for everyone through her welcome and defense of human life, those unborn and those abandoned and discarded.”

After founding the Missionaries of Charity in 1950, she went on to receive numerous honors and recognitions, including the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979.  She ran homes for those with leprosy, opened orphanages, clinics and schools.  She ran soup kitchens for the hungry.  Believing everyone had the power to make a difference she once said, “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.”

In honor of this remarkable woman now forever known as Saint Teresa of Calcutta, I wanted to share some of her most memorable quotes and words of wisdom.

  1. “Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.”
  2. “I know God will not give me anything I can’t handle. I just wish that He didn’t trust me so much.”
  3. “Let us always meet each other with smile, for the smile is the beginning of love.”
  4. “I have found the paradox, that if you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love.”
  5. “Each of us is merely a small instrument. When you look at the inner workings of electrical things, often you see small and big wires, new and old, cheap and expensive lined up. Until the current passes through them there will be no light. That wire is you and me. The current is God. We have the power to let the current pass through us, use us, produce the light of the world. Or we can refuse to be used and allow darkness to spread.”
  6. “Let us not be satisfied with just giving money. Money is not enough, money can be got, but they need your hearts to love them. So, spread your love everywhere you go.”
  7. “If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.”
  8. “I see somebody dying, I pick him up. I find somebody hungry, I give him food. He can love and be loved. I don’t look at his color, I don’t look at his religion. I don’t look at anything. Every person whether he is Hindu, Muslim or Buddhist, he is my brother, my sister.”
  9. “If you judge people, you have no time to love them.”
  10. “We ourselves feel that what we are doing is just a drop in the ocean. But the ocean would be less because of that missing drop.”
  11. “Love begins at home, and it is not how much we do… but how much love we put in that action.”
  12. “The hunger for love is much more difficult to remove than the hunger for bread.””
  13. “Each one of them is Jesus in disguise.”
  14. “We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.”
  15. “I am not sure exactly what heaven will be like, but I know that when we die and it comes time for God to judge us, he will not ask, ‘How many good things have you done in your life?’ rather he will ask, ‘How much love did you put into what you did?”
  16. “Loneliness and the feeling of being unwanted is the most terrible poverty.”
  17. “Let us remain as empty as possible so that God can fill us up.”
  18. “Peace begins with a smile.”
  19. “Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.”
  20. “Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing.”
  21. “Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.”

Mother Teresa died on September 5, 1997—a day which will now be recognized as her feast day by the Catholic Church. When once speaking of death, she noted, “Death is nothing else but going home to God, the bond of love will be unbroken for all eternity.”  Very true.  Just as the bond of love will be forever unbroken, Saint Teresa of Calcutta will forever live. Her love and kindness forever remembered.